Friday, February 12, 2021

Writing: Any questions?

 


This has been a busy time at our house--today, we finally got the last touches put on our shower. We still have to wait up to a couple of weeks for the glass wall to complete it, but we should be able to use our new shower tonight. Yay!

Then I noticed that I hadn't written a blog for tomorrow, which is Friday, my usual day to set forth my undying wisdom about the writing game. So instead, I'll ask you if you have any questions you'd like me to answer. (Since this also goes up at my author page, let me ask that you go here to ask them, so that I can let everyone see your question and what I made up--I mean, answered).

7 comments:

Priscilla Bettis said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Richard Mabry said...

Changed it--see if that works. Anyway, ask the questions here, not at rmabrybooks link.

Priscilla Bettis said...

(I deleted my previous comment. HERE's my question.) How do you keep track of what day it is in your ms? Especially with edits and inserted scenes because the days get all mixed up, and it's like untangling spaghetti to get the timeline right!

Richard Mabry said...

Keeping track of the timeline and character names have thrown me for a loop, especially in my earlier novels. I've gotten better with experience. I've found that it helps for me to go through my WIP and keep a running tally of a timeline. As for the names, I've still found instances of calling a character Jim in one place and Bill in another

Michelle said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Richard Mabry said...

Here's a question that was deleted--but let me answer it anyway. Ignoring the details, the crux of the question is: Where would you have to be shot in the chest that would go straight through and yet kill you?
After looking at the human anatomy, it's fairly obvious that missing any vital structures would require some marksmanship and more than a little luck. Instead, I'd shoot into the shoulder (if you or the shooter is willing to risk some residuals from that gunshot wound) and blame the "death" that follows on blood loss.
This again points up the problem of designing a scenario and then looking for the real-life answer...it doesn't always happen. But keep trying

Richard Mabry said...

Note: should be "not" kill you.