Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Rejection

I know...I said I was going to be gone for a few days. We changed our plans, so I have a couple more days to work at home.

My agent had a great post today about rejection. (While you're there, read my comment with some of my own rejection stories). She hates to turn down queries, and I've come to find that she's not alone in that. There may be a few agents and editors out there who enjoy crushing the hopes and dreams of aspiring writers, but they're in a definite minority.

Her post reminded me of this blog post detailing a rejection letter that probably lets the recipient down as easily as any such missive could. You can read the letter by going to this site, clicking on the letter, then clicking again to enlarge it.

For many years I was on the editorial board of several prestigious medical journals. The rejection rate for professional papers at that time was about 85%. Now it's somewhere near 90+%. It was always difficult to reject papers that, had there been unlimited space, would have been publishable. But the harsh reality was that only the absolute best of the ones crossing my desk would be published. Of course, my own professional papers got turned down as well. Although I had over 100 of them published in a 35+ year career, I still was "turned down more times than a Holiday Inn bedspread."

Rejection. It happens. I hope you won't let it stop you from doing what you love, whether it's writing or (since spring training is about to start) working on your curve ball. I never made it out of semi-pro baseball to the majors or even the low minors. But that didn't stop me from trying. Hope you'll do the same, and keep pursuing your dreams despite rejections.

5 comments:

Rachelle said...

Good reminder, Richard. Thanks for the link!

lynnrush said...

Great post, Richard. So, you were into baseball? That's one of my favorite things to watch. I'm a huge Atlanta Braves fan. Even went to their spring training one year in Florida. It was a blast.

Anyway, back to rejections...I read Rachelle's post. Yes, rejection is a part of the business, that's for sure.

So, here's to pressing on! Have a great day.

Katherine Mary said...

GOOD MORNING... Love baseball. Do you remember this guy? He is my first cousin and is still around.
Wally Westlake - BR Bullpen

Dec 16, 2008 Wally Westlake had a 10-year career in the majors, primarily as an outfielder. His best year was in 1949 for the Pittsburgh Pirates,

Wally Westlake Baseball Stats by Baseball Almanac

Wally Westlake baseball stats with batting stats, pitching stats and fielding stats, along with uniform numbers, salaries, quotes, career stats and biographical data presented by Baseball Almanac. Wally Westlake was born on Monday, November 8, 1920, in Gridley, California. Westlake was 26 years old when he broke into...
Blessins.. Katherine Mary

Catherine West said...

"Turned down more than a Holiday Inn bedspread." That's hilarious! Hadn't actually heard that before. Yes, you're right, they're all right, but it still smarts. But all part of the business, so we press on.
Have a good holiday!

Katherine Mary said...

GOOD MORNING... Love baseball. Do you remember this guy? He is my first cousin and is still around.
Wally Westlake - BR Bullpen

Dec 16, 2008 Wally Westlake had a 10-year career in the majors, primarily as an outfielder. His best year was in 1949 for the Pittsburgh Pirates,

Wally Westlake Baseball Stats by Baseball Almanac

Wally Westlake baseball stats with batting stats, pitching stats and fielding stats, along with uniform numbers, salaries, quotes, career stats and biographical data presented by Baseball Almanac. Wally Westlake was born on Monday, November 8, 1920, in Gridley, California. Westlake was 26 years old when he broke into...
Blessins.. Katherine Mary