Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Behind The Mask

The first time I recall seeing people wearing a Guy Fawkes mask was during the Occupy Wall Street movement. For those who don't know, Guy Fawkes was one of the leaders of the Gunpowder Plot, an effort to blow up the British House of Lords. The mask was popularized in the movie, V for Vendetta.

Over the past few years the stylized mask has evolved into a global symbol of dissent, employed by everyone from shadowy computer hackers to Turkish airline workers. Since the Occupy Wall Street movement fizzled out, I haven't seen much of people actually hiding behind a mask...until I started (against my better judgment) to read some of the comments posted on a few Internet sites and realized that the mask (that is, hiding one's identity) was alive and well.

Is it just because people can hide behind the "mask" of screen names that they feel free to post the vitriol I saw there? Or is that the state of our society now? I'd write more, but I'm afraid I'd descend to the depths of those people who currently cloak their identity with that mask.

On my own Facebook site, I see differing opinions, and I'm OK with that--to a point. Some of these people are friends, even relatives, and their civil disagreement with me is reasonable. But if you're using my Facebook page to spew trash, I'm going to "unfriend" you. I've already started...and, frankly, it feels good.

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Friday, April 21, 2017

Writing: Rules

We never went as far as the picture shows, but when I was practicing medicine I saw numerous signs to turn off cell phones before entering an area, seeing the doctor, etc. Although sometimes the reason given was they might interfere with electrical equipment in the area, most of the time it was actually so they wouldn't interrupt the activity going on there. The rule might be expressed in different ways, but the reason was there.

When I first started writing, one of the first rules I learned was to choose active verbs, rather than passive ones. The reason, I was told, was to take the action forward at a faster pace, and this made sense. Then I was told to use verbs in a special way in order to keep the reader's attention. I never fully got the reason behind this, but I saw examples like, "Her fingers fisted" and "the artery in her temple pulsed." These, unlike the others, didn't make as much sense to me. I preferred the more conventional, "She made a fist" and "the vessel throbbed."

There are lots of rules in writing--some make sense, others don't (to me, at least). I suppose that's why I like the work of the late Robert B. Parker. He wrote in simple declarative sentences, and I never had to employ a dictionary to translate the words. Nor did I have to stop and think about the writing. It was clear.

Do you ever encounter writing that makes you take a step back and ask yourself why the words were put together that way? What is your opinion of rules? I'd like to hear.

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Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Spring

Spring is here. I've never kept up with the differences between meteorological and calendar spring--I leave that to the weather persons. For me, I can tell it's spring when baseball season has started, we can take the freeze-proof covers off our outdoor faucets, the golf courses are more crowded, and kids start itching for school to be out.

What does spring mean to you? Let me know in the comments section.

And come back Friday to read my "writing" post.

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Friday, April 14, 2017

Easter Weekend


The angel spoke to the women: "There is nothing to fear here. I know you're looking for Jesus, the One they nailed to the cross. He is not here. He was raised, just as he said. Come and look at the place where he was placed...Now, get on your way quickly and tell his disciples, 'He is risen from the dead'...."
(Matt 28:5-7a, The Message)

In the ancient world, the message was this: "Christos anesti; al├ęthos anesti."

In our modern language, the words are different, the message the same: "Christ is risen! He is risen indeed!"

Have a blessed Easter.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Only In Texas

We were playing golf recently and my partner (who has never met a stranger) was talking with a man he met on the first tee. "I was born in Memphis, Texas. That's near Turkey." Because I'd heard this before, I almost missed the man's response. "Yep. Home of Bob Wills." For those of you who aren't acquainted with Texas music, Bob Will and the Texas Playboys pioneered the type of music known as "Western Swing."

My own history goes back to Decatur, Texas--best known through the dice-rolling chant, "Eighter from Decatur." We had the Waggoner Mansion, the Chisolm Trail (which ran through the men's room at the Wise County Courthouse, leading to some jokes I won't repeat here), and several other things for which we were famous, but nothing topped "Eighter from Decatur."

What's your favorite town, and why? It doesn't even have to be in Texas. Leave a comment with your answer. (I'll be away from a computer today, so talk among yourselves--and play nicely).